Protecting the states most vulnerable

A bill that is advancing in Congress this week could help Ohio’s endangered species. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would provide more than $1.3 billion a year to implement federally approved wildlife conservation efforts. Ohio’s portion of the bill could be up to $28 million per year. This would go to help protect a plethora of endangered species in the state, including the Indiana Bat, which plays an important role in our environment.

The Indiana Bat has been listed as endangered since 1967 across the United States. Like other little brown bats, Indiana bats migrate to caves in southern Ohio and neighboring states to hibernate. These bats are nocturnal and only feed one or two hours before or after sunset. They are important to our ecosystem as they help control pests by feeding on various bugs.

For information on bat removal, visit Critter Detective.

Bill Would Provide $28 Million to Protect Ohio’s Endangered Species

More than a third of America’s fish and wildlife species are at increased risk of extinction, but a bill advancing in Congress this week could help.

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act is scheduled for markup in the House Natural Resources Committee Thursday.

Ohio’s portion of the fund would be approximately $28 million each year.

There are 94 species listed as endangered in the Buckeye State, including the black bear, Indiana bat and Allegheny woodrat. Read more

Summary: A bill that is advancing in Congress this week could help Ohio’s endangered species. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would provide more than $1.3 billion a year to help protect wild animals.

Indiana Bat Information

The Indiana bat has been listed federally under the Endangered Species Act since 1967. They have been declining over the years due to reductions in available habitat. It was not until 1974 that the first maternity colony was discovered in Indiana.

Like little brown bats (to which they bear a close resemblance), Indiana bats migrate to caves in southern Ohio and neighboring states to hibernate. Learn more

Summary: The Indiana Bat has been listed as endangered since 1967 across the United States. Like other little brown bats, Indiana bats migrate to caves in southern Ohio and neighboring states to hibernate.

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