Milder temps and no snow to blame

In Ohio, mating season for skunks usually begins in the month of February. However, officials have been getting more and more calls about active skunks in the state, about two weeks earlier than normal. This is likely due to the lack of snowfall and the warmer temperatures that have hung around for longer than is typical for the midwest. Residents have complained about smelling skunks more frequently and seeing them more often than they have in the last few months. If locals have a skunk in their yards, they can call the ODNR for help removing the animal.

An Ohio Wildlife council has received numerous proposals to make changes to hunting seasons in the state. The proposals were primarily for small game and bird hunting. However, part of the proposal included requiring a fur taker permit for coyote hunting and adding the animal to the list of species that can be hunted during the furbearer trapping season. Coyote sightings have increased in the last few years in many places across the United States.

For information on skunk removal, visit Critter Detective.

Why skunk mating season is early this year

You can blame no snow and milder temperatures for skunks being more active.

“Since we’ve been uncommonly warm, they come out more and not so much see them, but you smell them,” said Matthew Hunt, a state wildlife officer with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Although the skunk mating season doesn’t officially start for another two weeks, the ODNR already is seeing an uptick in calls about them across the Miami Valley. Read more

Summary: In Ohio, mating season for skunks usually begins in the month of February. However, officials have been getting more and more calls about active skunks in the state, about two weeks earlier than normal.

Ohio Wildlife Council receives small game hunting season proposals

Proposed small game and migratory bird hunting seasons that begin in the fall of 2020 were presented to the Ohio Wildlife Council on Wednesday, Jan. 15, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. Included among the proposals are several changes recommended to increase hunting opportunities for those who enjoy spending time in Ohio’s great outdoors.

New proposals also include requiring a fur taker permit for coyote hunting and trapping, and adding coyote to the furbearer trapping season. Learn more

Summary: An Ohio Wildlife council has received numerous proposals to make changes to hunting seasons in the state. The proposals were primarily for small game and bird hunting.

 

 

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