The animals show no signs of staying away from urban areas

Another coyote sighting near a suburban area was reported recently in Ohio. Coyotes are not native to the state of Ohio but have been spotted more frequently in the past few years. Coyotes are highly adaptive animals and will go anywhere that there is a solid food source and places for shelter. They seem to be moving closer and closer to humans thanks to the destruction of their more natural habitats. They are usually not aggressive towards humans unless they feel threatened or backed into a corner.

A proposed new regulation for designating coyotes under current fur-bearer animals may be put on hold. With the new regulations, the hunting and trapping of coyotes in Ohio would be limited to current fur-bearer seasons and reduce the ability of residents to trap and kill nuisance coyotes on their property. After concerns were made known to the ODNR, they decided to temporarily halt the passing of the new law. Some residents worried that this regulation would hinder their ability to protect their animals and land from the predatory animal.

For tips on wildlife handling, visit Critter Detective.

Coyote spotted near Bay Village

While coyotes are not native to Ohio they have been seen frequently in the area.

The Bay Village Police Department urges people to make themselves aware of the presence of coyotes and take necessary precautions.

“They’re not aggressive toward people unless cornered, so don’t corner one. If you see one and it doesn’t appear to be afraid of you, that’s not unusual. Since they live amongst people they have no fear of people,” said Bay Village police Lt. Calvin Holliday. Read more

Summary: Another coyote sighting near a suburban area was reported recently in Ohio. Coyotes are not native to the state of Ohio but have been spotted more frequently in the past few years.

Proposed coyote trapping changes put on hold

When coyote predation becomes a problem for a livestock operation, it can be a major issue that requires extensive measures to address. For this reason, an Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife proposal to designated coyotes as furbearers generated concerns from Ohio’s agriculture and hunters and trappers.

“There are a fair amount of hunters that don’t agree with it,” said Mike Rex, who sits on the Ohio Wildlife Council. “They see coyotes as vermin and not a furbearing animal like a fox, and they don’t think there should be any additional regulation.” Learn more

Summary: A proposed new regulation for designating coyotes under current fur-bearer animals may be put on hold. With the new regulations, the hunting and trapping of coyotes in Ohio would be limited to current fur-bearer seasons.

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