Raccoon found to be infected

A raccoon was recently found to be infected with the rabies virus in Wheeling-Ohio County. The raccoon was initially tested on March 23rd and was confirmed to be rabid on March 26th. Many health departments across the United States regularly test animals for rabies throughout the year to better understand and combat the potentially fatal disease. Exposure to humans can occur through a bite or scratch from an infected animal.

With Spring right around the corner, or already here for some areas farther south, wildlife will begin to become more active and this includes a whole bunch of new baby wildlife as well. There are often plenty of myths and weird facts about baby animals floating around, so one Ohio Wildlife center is setting the record straight. One of the most common myths about young wildlife is that mothers will abandon their younglings if they have a human scent on them. While you should avoid interacting unfamiliar wildlife, especially babies, the scent of a human is not enough to deter a mother from caring for her young.

For more information on raccoon removal, visit Critter Detective.

Rabies case reported by Wheeling-Ohio County

The Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department is announcing that a raccoon has tested positive for rabies. The raccoon was found in the Woodsdale area of Wheeling. The raccoon preliminary tested positive for rabies March 23, 2020, and was confirmed on March 26, 2020.

This is the second laboratory-confirmed animal rabies case in Ohio County for 2020.  In 2019 two positive rabies cases (raccoon and groundhog) were found in Ohio County.

The Wheeling-Ohio County Health Department and other county health departments in West Virginia, along with the United States Department of Agriculture-Wildlife Services regularly test animals for rabies throughout the year. Read more

Summary: A raccoon was recently found to be infected with the rabies virus in Wheeling-Ohio County. The raccoon was initially tested on March 23rd and was confirmed to be rabid on March 26th.

4 myths about baby wildlife

Spring is here and soon you will see baby animals in your neighborhood. As Lake Erie Nature & Science Center’s wildlife staff prepares for their busiest season of the year, here are four of the most common myths related to baby wildlife.

MYTH: “Mothers often abandon baby wildlife in nature.”

Baby wildlife is rarely abandoned in nature. Mothers will often leave their young unattended for hours for a variety of reasons. Learn more

Summary: here are often plenty of myths and weird facts about baby animals floating around, so one Ohio Wildlife center is setting the record straight. one of the most common myths about young wildlife is that mothers will abandon their younglings if they have a human scent on them.

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