How some people are making a difference

Ohio Wildlife Center volunteers are setting up makeshift bat caves in their own homes to help at risk bats during the harsher winter months. Bats end up in the centers care for a variety of reasons, including becoming orphaned, sick, or malnourished. Bats that arrive to the center in the fall months pose a greater problem because they miss the window of opportunity to migrate south to a warmer climate and must be housed all winter long during their hibernation period. That is where volunteers come in and use their own homes as shelter for the winged animals.

Coyote mating season is well underway in the state of Ohio and much of the United States and will continue through the end of March. With mating season, coyotes become increasingly active during both daylight and nighttime hours as they search for food, shelter and mates. This is why many Ohio residents will begin or already have seen more coyotes in urban and suburban areas. Coyotes are opportunistic hunters and will go almost anywhere where there is a consistent food source.

For tips on safe animal removal, pay a visit to Critter Detective.

Ohio Volunteers Make Homes Into Bat Caves

For many homeowners, a visit from a bat is cause for consternation, even panic. But to Ann Wookey, theyโ€™re welcome guests. Wookey has a room in her basement just for bats, outfitted with ropes for roosting, mesh for climbing and other creature comforts geared to the tiny winged mammals.

Wookey, who works as a keeper at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, volunteers for the Ohio Wildlife Center as one of a small cadre of certified wildlife rehabilitation workers who are trained in the care of bats. See more

Summary: Ohio Wildlife Center volunteers are setting up makeshift bat caves in their own homes to help at risk bats during the harsher winter months. Bats end up in the centers care for a variety of reasons, including becoming orphaned, sick, or malnourished.

Mating season means coyotes are more prevalent

With coyote mating season in full swing through the end of March, it’s not unusual to see a coyote in both rural and urban settings. Experts say coyotes usually don’t attack humans, but they will go after small dogs and other animals.

“You could see one in downtown Lancaster,” Fairfield Soil & Water Conservation District wildlife specialist Tommy Springer said. “There’s plenty of food for them in a downtown area. They like small rodents and they’ll dig through trash looking for fruits or tomatoes. There’s no shortage of food for them.” Read more

Summary: Coyote mating season is well underway in the state of Ohio and much of the United States and will continue through the end of March. With mating season, coyotes become increasingly active during both daylight and nighttime hours.

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